Rain tonight!


KTRE weather reports a wet time this October 31st evening, Brad says, “Halloween candy seekers can expect some wet weather
You may need a waterproof costume as rain chances will be ratcheting up across East Texas this evening. Please play it safe on the slick streets.”
The forecast says, “Wet with up to a 90% chance of rain and Temperatures of 57-60 between 7pm and 9pm tonight.”

Should Christians Celebrate Halloween?

Should Christians Celebrate Halloween?


By BGEA • Topics: Culture, Holidays

It’s not uncommon for people to struggle with whether to celebrate Halloween. Some see it as a dark day full of evil influence while others deem it a harmless time for fun costumes and candy. This answer from the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association may offer some guidance on Halloween and even give you creative ideas for using the holiday to share Christ:

Q: I have mixed feelings about how our family should be involved in Halloween. What should I do?
A: People come to different conclusions about celebrating Halloween, particularly if they have young children or grandchildren to consider.

For some people, this holiday is a time for dress-up and candy; it is an opportunity for fun. Others express concern for their children’s safety or for the emphasis that is often made on violence or horror at this time of year. Those who are interested in the right or wrong of the celebration may look at the holiday’s origin in the occult and believe it should not be celebrated at all; they are aware that some groups celebrate Halloween as a tribute to Satan.f

Do you know someone who has questions about Halloween, or about the evil and darkness often associated with the day?

Share this page at BGEA with them.

On the other hand, others recognize that Halloween, the eve of “All Saints’ Day” (November 1), is also associated with Martin Luther and the Reformation. They celebrate the religious freedoms won at that time in history. Since each of these perspectives contain truth, it is difficult to know how to respond.

We encourage each family to develop their own approach to Halloween based on their own convictions and the options for celebration available to them. The responsibility to make this decision rests on the adults in the family, not the children. The peer pressure on children is far too great for them to be objective. Certainly, providing a safe, fun environment must be a priority.

Some parents adapt the traditional Halloween practices, while others develop totally different alternatives. These alternatives may include fall festival parties where children are encouraged to dress in a particular theme such as positive cartoon or book characters, famous historical characters, or Bible heroes.

Carrying out that theme with simple acting can be fun and an opportunity for teaching values. Children will always be attracted to costumes and treats; finding positive ways to enjoy these pleasures is the primary challenge for caring adults.

If you decide to make a major change in the way your family celebrates Halloween, you may not need to do all the work yourself. We would encourage you to contact churches in your area to determine what activities are being planned.

Rather than separate completely from the night’s activities, some Christians give Gospel tracts along with treats to children who come to their homes and make Halloween an opportunity to witness for Christ. Others offer safe places for lighthearted fun.

Want to share the Gospel with your neighbors? Click here on Download and receive a kid-friendly “Steps to Peace with God” booklet to give to trick-or-treaters.

Halloween Safety Tips

Halloween is an exciting time of year for kids, and to help ensure they

Halloween is an exciting time of year for kids, and to help ensure they have a safe holiday, here are some tips from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Feel free to excerpt these tips or use them in their entirety for any print or broadcast story, with acknowledgment of source.

ALL DRESSED UP:

  • Plan costumes that are bright and reflective. Make sure that shoes fit well and t hat costumes are short enough to prevent tripping, entanglement or contact with flame.
  • Consider adding reflective tape or striping to costumes and trick-or-treat bags for greater visibility.
  • Because masks can limit or block eyesight, consider non-toxic makeup and decorative hats as safer alternatives. Hats should fit properly to prevent them from sliding over eyes. Makeup should be tested ahead of time on a small patch of skin to ensure there are no unpleasant surprises on the big day.
  • When shopping for costumes, wigs and accessories look for and purchase those with a label clearly indicating they are flame resistant.
  • If a sword, cane, or stick is a part of your child’s costume, make sure it is not sharp or long. A child may be easily hurt by these accessories if he stumbles or trips.
  • Do not use decorative contact lenses without an eye examination and a prescription from an eye care professional. While the packaging on decorative lenses will often make claims such as “one size fits all,” or “no need to see an eye specialist,” obtaining decorative contact lenses without a prescription is both dangerous and illegal. This can cause pain, inflammation, and serious eye disorders and infections, which may lead to permanent vision loss.
  • Review with children how to call 9-1-1 (or their local emergency number) if they ever have an emergency or become lost.

CARVING A NICHE:

  • Small children should never carve pumpkins. Children can draw a face with markers. Then parents can do the cutting.
    Consider using a flashlight or glow stick instead of a candle to light your pumpkin. If you do use a candle, a votive candle is safest.
  • Candlelit pumpkins should be placed on a sturdy table, away from curtains and other flammable objects, and not on a porch or any path where visitors may pass close by. They should never be left unattended.

HOME SAFE HOME:

  • To keep homes safe for visiting trick-or-treaters, parents should remove from the porch and front yard anything a child could trip over such as garden hoses, toys, bikes and lawn decorations.
    Parents should check outdoor lights and replace burned-out bulbs.
  • Wet leaves or snow should be swept from sidewalks and steps.
    Restrain pets so they do not inadvertently jump on or bite a trick-or-treater.

ON THE TRICK-OR-TREAT TRAIL:

  • A parent or responsible adult should always accompany young children on their neighborhood rounds.
  • Obtain flashlights with fresh batteries for all children and their escorts.
  • If your older children are going alone, plan and review the route that is acceptable to you. Agree on a specific time when they should return home.
  • Only go to homes with a porch light on and never enter a home or car for a treat.
  • Because pedestrian injuries are the most common injuries to children on Halloween, remind Trick-or-Treaters:
  • Stay in a group and communicate where they will be going.
  • Remember reflective tape for costumes and trick-or-treat bags.
  • Carry a cellphone for quick communication.
  • Remain on well-lit streets and always use the sidewalk.
  • If no sidewalk is available, walk at the far edge of the roadway facing traffic.
  • Never cut across yards or use alleys.
  • Only cross the street as a group in established crosswalks (as recognized by local custom).
  • Never cross between parked cars or out driveways.
  • Don’t assume the right of way. Motorists may have trouble seeing Trick-or-Treaters. Just because one car stops, doesn’t mean others will!
  • Law enforcement authorities should be notified immediately of any suspicious or unlawful activity.

HEALTHY HALLOWEEN:

  • A good meal prior to parties and trick-or-treating will discourage youngsters from filling up on Halloween treats.
  • Consider purchasing non-food treats for those who visit your home, such as coloring books or pens and pencils.
  • Wait until children are home to sort and check treats. Though tampering is rare, a responsible adult should closely examine all treats and throw away any spoiled, unwrapped or suspicious items.
  • Try to ration treats for the days and weeks following Halloween.

©2017 American Academy of Pediatrics

Don’t Have a Spirit of Fear

God has not given us the spirit of fear, but of power, and of love, and of a sound mind. (2 Timothy 1:7)

In peace I will lie down and sleep, for you alone, LORD, make me dwell in safety. (Psalms 4:8)

He who dwells in the secret place of the Most High Shall abide under the shadow of the Almighty. I will say of the Lord, “ He is my refuge and my fortress; My God, in Him I will trust.” (PSALM 91:1-2)

God Closer Than You Think


God is closer to you than you realize. Here is a psalm to show you wherever you are, God is there!

Psalm 139:7-8 “I can never escape from your Spirit! I can never get away from your presence! If I go up to heaven, you are there; if I go down to the grave, you are there.

No matter where we are, in life or death, God is there. God has always been at work in your life

If you have just started to pursue God, it might feel like God is a new part of your life. In reality, however, the Bible makes it clear that God has been at work in your life before you were born. From conception to death, God has a plan for your life.

Psalm 139:13, 15-16 “You made all the delicate, inner parts of my body and knit me together in my mother’s womb…You watched me as I was being formed in utter seclusion, as I was woven together in the dark of the womb. You saw me before I was born. Every day of my life was recorded in your book. Every moment was laid out before a single day had passed.