Patriot Day: 9/11 Commemoration

Patriot Day: 9/11 Commemoration

KSWP will hold a “Moment of Silence” to correspond with and in observant of … the attacks on September 11, 2001.

The show of respect begins at 7:46 a.m. (CDT) this morning. It’s the time the first plane, American Airlines Flight 11, struck the North Tower of the World Trade Center.

Go Here for more info on “Patriot Day.

Cop Finds Baby in Hot Car, Shatters Window.

Cop Finds Baby in Hot Car, Shatters Window.

By Carolyn Marie of Lifeable

Policeman Pulls Baby to Safety, Learns He’s Made Horrible Mistake.

Lt. Jason Short responded to a 911 call about a baby left alone in a car on a hot day. He rushed over to the Keene, New Hampshire, shopping plaza parking lot to check out the situation.

There was a blanket draped over a car seat. Little feet were sticking out from under the blanket.

It was a 90 degree day, so his next course of action seemed obvious. He needed to break a window and rescue the baby. The baby’s skin was blotchy and pale.

Short hit his baton against the window and pulled the baby out of the car seat. He called an ambulance, terrified that the baby was already dead.

The baby’s skin was blotchy and pale. The scene was starting to draw a crowd of concerned onlookers. Short began CPR rescue breaths. Something did not feel right, though.

He pushed his finger to the baby’s mouth and realized the baby was definitely not alive. The baby was an incredibly realistic looking: doll.

Carolynne Seiffert was the owner of the car and the doll. She was getting her hair cut at Super Cuts while her new car’s window was smashed to rescue her doll.

Short told News Reporters, “I would never assume that it’s a doll. I would always assume that it’s a child. I would never do anything different.”

Seiffert purchased this “reborn” doll for $2,300. The doll weighs 10 pounds, 7 ounces and wears real baby clothes.

More details on this story here.

How to Talk to Children About 9/11

How to Talk to Children About 9/11
The anniversary of 9/11 is always a painful one but there is also the desire to honor the dead, the families who bore the burden of the attack, and the things we stand for as a nation.  We celebrate resilience and renewal even as we vow not to forget.  For many younger children, 9/11 isn’t something they lived through, but a piece of history, something they learn about in school.

Here are some guidelines for talking to kids about 9/11.

  1. Take your cues from your child—each child, individually, if you have more than one. For those old enough to remember the events of 9/11, let them tell you what the anniversary means to them, what they remember, and how they feel about it.
  2. Be age appropriate. If a child is too young to remember 9/11, consider their age in deciding whether this is a good time for her to learn about it, or learn more about it.
  3. Don’t answer questions that aren’t asked. Children as young as first grade are learning about 9/11 in school, as an important part of our history. But there’s no reason to volunteer disturbing or frightening details unless a child has heard them and needs a reality check from you.
  4. Try to avoid exposing children to the intrusive, repetitive TV news coverage, especially the pictures of 9/11.
  5. Help them feel safe. They want to know “are we safe today?”
  6. Focus on resilience. If you go to a memorial, talk to kids in advance about why you’re going, focusing on honoring those who died, and celebrating the resilience of both the nation and the individual families who lost loved ones.
  7. Don’t focus on hatred.
  8. Don’t feel you have only one chance to talk about this. It’s better to think of tough issues as an ongoing conversation, which develops as kids grow and change. If you feel you haven’t gotten it right the first time, give yourself a break and try again later.