How To Get Your Kids Talking

o-talking-with-kidsWe want to have meaningful conversations with our kids, but when we ask lame questions, we just get one word answers! Ask open ended questions to stimulate a conversation. Have follow up questions ready.  

 Here’s some examples:
Tell me about the best part of your day.

What’s been the hardest part of this week for you?

Did your brother say anything that made you laugh today? What’s the funniest thing about your mom?

Which friends do you miss most from school?

What’s the biggest difference between this summer and last summer?

bubble-maker-150x150Tell me about what you read this week?

What’s the hardest video game we have? (Let’s play it together and maybe I can help!)

Who did you play with today? What did you play? Who won? (Why do you think they always seem to win?

What used up most of your energy today?

What did I promise you this summer that I haven’t delivered on yet?

What rules are different at school than our rules at home? Do you think they’re fair?

What’s on your bucketlist this summer? Give me your top 5!

What do you like most about our neighborhood?

What do you feel that God has been teaching you this week?

Can you show me something you learned (or did) today? (When you see your kid do something well, ask them to teach you how to do it!)

How to Get our Kids Talking

imageWe want to have meaningful conversations with our kids, but when we ask lame questions, we just get one word answers! Ask open ended questions to stimulate a conversation. Have follow up questions ready.

(Once you’ve tried… Let us know you results…

Here’s some examples:k

  • Tell me about the best part of your day.
  • What’s been the hardest part of this week for you?
  • Did your brother say anything that made you laugh today?
  • What’s the funniest thing about your mom?
  • Which friends do you miss most from school?
  • What’s the biggest difference between this summer and last summer?
  • Tell me about what you read this week?
  • What’s the hardest video game we have? (Let’s play it together and maybe I can help!)
  • Who did you play with today? What did you play? Who won?Why do you think they always seem to win?
  • What used up most of your energy today?
  • What did I promise you this summer that I haven’t delivered on yet?
  • What rules are different at school than our rules at home? Do you think they’re fair?
  • What’s on your bucketlist this summer? Give me your top 5!
  • What do you like most about our neighborhood?
  • What do you feel that God has been teaching you this week?
  • Can you show me something you learned (or did) today? (When you see your kid do something well, ask them to teach you how to do it!)

Funny Conversations, Input Needed

conversations-peopleWe enjoy hearing funny conversations that go on between people during their everyday lives. Today, We’re posting some of the hilarious statements that were made between airport control towers and airline pilots.

A DC-10 had come in a little hot and thus had an exceedingly long rollout after touching down.

San Jose Tower noted: “American 751, make a hard right turn at the end of the runway, if you are able.
If you are not able, take the Guadelupe exit off Highway 101, make a right at the lights and return to the airport.”

input-neededInput Needed: We’d love it if you helped us understand your content needs better. What is the kind of content do you like most on the Good Friends Blog? Is it:

  • News about children’s health, learning and development?
  • Activity ideas for holidays and all year ’round?
  • The “My Story” personal stories about life and other things from you and other Good Friends?
  • What are you interested in… We could talk about?
  • Faith, Family, Friends, etc.
  • Other? Include suggestions you are interested in?

What would you like to see more of? Thank you, use the comment section below!

How to Talk to Children About 9/11

How to Talk to Children About 9/11
The anniversary of 9/11 is always a painful one but there is also the desire to honor the dead, the families who bore the burden of the attack, and the things we stand for as a nation.  We celebrate resilience and renewal even as we vow not to forget.  For many younger children, 9/11 isn’t something they lived through, but a piece of history, something they learn about in school.

Here are some guidelines for talking to kids about 9/11.

  1. Take your cues from your child—each child, individually, if you have more than one. For those old enough to remember the events of 9/11, let them tell you what the anniversary means to them, what they remember, and how they feel about it.
  2. Be age appropriate. If a child is too young to remember 9/11, consider their age in deciding whether this is a good time for her to learn about it, or learn more about it.
  3. Don’t answer questions that aren’t asked. Children as young as first grade are learning about 9/11 in school, as an important part of our history. But there’s no reason to volunteer disturbing or frightening details unless a child has heard them and needs a reality check from you.
  4. Try to avoid exposing children to the intrusive, repetitive TV news coverage, especially the pictures of 9/11.
  5. Help them feel safe. They want to know “are we safe today?”
  6. Focus on resilience. If you go to a memorial, talk to kids in advance about why you’re going, focusing on honoring those who died, and celebrating the resilience of both the nation and the individual families who lost loved ones.
  7. Don’t focus on hatred.
  8. Don’t feel you have only one chance to talk about this. It’s better to think of tough issues as an ongoing conversation, which develops as kids grow and change. If you feel you haven’t gotten it right the first time, give yourself a break and try again later.