Teaching Kids About Gratitude

How to teach your kids to be grateful- give them less!

I think most of us agree that this principle is true, but why can’t we bring ourselves to actually do this?

As parents, despite wanting to give our kids everything, one of the greatest gifts we can give is to literally give less, to force decision-making and awareness among all their choices. We need to have more faith in them and let them be challenged. It’s not easy to watch your kids struggle—but in the end, it does breed gratitude. And there is no question that these lessons are most effective if you start early and consistently through every child’s primary occupation: play.

When The Kids Move Away

It’s a tough reality – your kids will grow up! Since they were born you think about their every need.  You want them to be successful, respect others and get a good job but when that actually happens it can be a tough pill to swallow!  Having said “till we come to visit”with another child recently – we thought we’d share some tips on making the adjustment.  Here’s portions of a great article Ways to stay close when kids grow up and move away…

SHOW RESPECT Search for any excuse to offer a compliment. If you catch yourself being critical, make at least five positive comments or actions before the end of your call or visit. Research has shown that a positive-to-negative interaction ratio of five-to-one or better can help maintain closeness in our relationships with our children (and our own spouses, too).

DON’T GIVE ADVICE If your adult child requests your advice, say, “I’m happy to help you sort through the pros and cons, but it’s your decision to make, and I know you’ll make the right choice.”  Provide direct advice only if the adult child is about to make a massive and potentially irreversible misstep.

BEFRIEND YOUR CHILD’S SPOUSE Search for ways to support and praise your sons- and daughters-in-law — even if you don’t really care for them.  Warning: The fact that your child criticizes his/her spouse to you does not mean that you are free to criticize that spouse, too. What you take as serious criticisms might just be your child venting normal frustrations.

DON’T INTRUDE Select noninvasive communication methods like emails, messages or texts OR Care packages unexpected mail is always fun! Warning: Do not follow up your packages with calls. These calls could make it seem like you are fishing for a thank-you or an invitation to visit. Gifts are most effective as relationship builders when there are no strings attached.

Imagination Station

I resently read a story about an “Imagination Station.” Each day as the kids enter a room, they begin by closing their eyes and entering into “imagination station” of their mind. There, they have no limits to what they can do. It is their one time to imagine more and … it is transforming the way they see the world.

Imagination is powerful because it invites you into a new story. Imagination is the force that takes you to places you have never been. Imagination welcomes the impossible.

The Bible says ‘As a man thinketh, so shall he become’. It also says ‘Without vision we perish’. You serve a God who wants to do even more with us than you could ever ask or imagine.

Henry Ford relied on imagination and belief. Walt Disney said that had he not seen Disneyland in his mind, the rest of the world would not have seen it on earth. Bill Gates first imagines his products before they become actual software that we rely on. And it would serve you well to remember that many of the world’s greatest people started with nothing and built empires. They had a dream and imagined into being.

How many toys do kids really need?

From Today’s Parenting By Carla Harms| Dec 1, 2017

Don’t worry about loading up your cart at the toy store to aid your kid’s development. Here’s how many toys they really need.

Before having my son, I had seen one too many living rooms taken over by toys. I was determined that my own house would never be filled with plastic blinking contraptions that would inevitably become tripping hazards and leave my husband and I howling in pain. But, like all the other things I said I would never do, I found it difficult to avoid once I actually became a parent.
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